Sensing emotions

The truth about dogs
 
The social systems of dogs and humans are very similar in structure. We both live in tight-knit families (or packs). We both have a complex language of facial expressions, body posture, and vocalizations that promote bonding. Dogs have learned over many centuries that the better they anticipated our thoughts and feelings, the more they were rewarded with food, shelter and affection.

Dogs have little to do all day other than sleep or observe our behaviour, so it's no wonder they know us so well.  “Is she happy?” your dog might wonder. “Is she mad? Should I run for cover?” With their fates so tied to our every whim, our dogs are wise to monitor our moods. A good mood might mean an extra cuddle or a game of fetch. A bad mood might mean scary loud noises and a day spent hiding under the bed. It makes sense that dogs would watch us so closely, as our changing moods give essential clues as to what is about to happen next.

Your dog is probably a far better observer than you are. We humans pay so much attention to language that it often interferes with our ability to see, smell, touch and hear what’s actually going on  around us.